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Imagetek Labels Expands Digital Printing Capabilities

Cheese Labels: A Producers Guide to Labeling

Cheese labeling has it’s own unique set of specifications set forth by the Department of Food Safety in the state of origin. Producers are challenged with not only creating a label thatCheese Labels provides brand identity and shelf appeal but also contains all the necessary components of a proper nutrition label. By following these guidelines, you will be able to produce a cheese product label that will meet food safety requirements with ease.

NAME OF PRODUCT: First, name your product with either a “Standard of identity” name, the common or usual name of the food or an appropriately descriptive term. The standard of identity must be used if the cheese fits the standard. Examples of standard of identity names include: Cheddar Cheese, Monterey Jack Cheese, Low-Moisture Part-Skim Mozzarella Cheese Common or usual names like String Cheese, Farmers Cheese, Farmers Pepper Cheese, Low-Moisture, Part-Skim Mozzarella Cheese. A semisoft cheese spiced or flavored standardized cheeses should be labeled with the spice at the beginning or the end of the cheese name. The spice or flavor name must not be between the cheese variety and the word “cheese”. Examples include Caraway Colby Cheese, Salami Cheddar Cheese, Colby Cheese with Caraway, Cheddar Cheese with Salami (the word cheese must be included in the name of the product). The name of the product must be in a type size that is 50 % the height of the largest print on the label and generally parallel to the base of the package. All words in the name need to be given equal prominence. You cannot make the word cheese or the variety of the cheese used stand out more than the rest of the name. Any optional ingredients that are required to be declared on the label should not be given greater prominence than the name of the food.

NET QUANTITY OF CONTENTS: Next, determine the quantity of your cheese product. The total quantity must be located on the front of the package (the principal display panel). This includes random weight packages. The quantity must be stated in US Customary (e.g., pounds and ounces) and metric units EXCEPT for random weight packages that are labeled at retail. These packages are exempt from the requirements for metric units. When a product exceeds 16 ounces, the net quantity of contents needs to be stated in the largest whole unit (e.g., pound, pint, quart, gallon) and the remaining ounces.

NUTRITION INFORMATION: Next, fill in your nutrition facts panel. The Full Format Nutrition Facts panel must be used on packages where the available labeling space is greater than 40 square inches. Single packs of slices, 6 ounce cups of shredded cheese, half moon blocks and large wedges are all package sizes that usually fit this size requirement. If there is less than 40 square inches of label space, the following are allowed in descending order of preference. 1. The column (vertical) display. The table at the bottom is replaced with a sentence stating, “Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.” 2. The tabular display 2. The linear (or string) format of the Nutrition Facts panel. Linear may only be used on packages when the package cannot accommodate a tabular display on any panel. Please note that cheese companies in particular are using the linear format with increasing frequency because they prefer how it looks on the label. This is undesirable and does not comply with NLEA requirements. The label is often designed this way because the companies do not want to use two labels. Remember that Nutrition Facts panels are based on the total available labeling space on the package. For cheese, this is the wrapped block minus the seams.

SERVING SIZE: Once you have completed your full nutrition panel, you must determine the serving size. The serving size could be measured in ounces or by a visual description must be used e.g. 1 ounce (28 g/about 1” cube). For random weight packages, the servings per container should be stated as “varied.” For exact weight packages, servings per container should equal the net weight divided by the serving size. The servings should be rounded to the nearest whole number except those that are between 2 and 5 servings should be rounded to the nearest 0.5 servings. Rounding should be indicated by the word “about.”

INGREDIENTS STATEMENT: In most cases, ingredients must be listed in descending order of predominance by weight (most to least). To learn more about whether your cheese qualifies foringredient statement exemptions click here. Cheese producers must use full standard of identity names and common or usual names of the ingredients. Common or Usual Names for Typical Ingredients Used in Dairy Products Ingredient Common or Usual Name skim milk, concentrated skim milk, reconstituted skim, and nonfat dry milk ” skim milk” or “nonfat milk”, concentrated milk, reconstituted milk, and dry whole milk “milk” bacteria culture “cultured ____”(the blank is filled in with the name of the milk used) sweet cream buttermilk, concentrated sweet cream buttermilk, reconstituted sweet cream buttermilk and dried sweet cream buttermilk “buttermilk ” whey, and concentrated whey are common ingredients. All sub-ingredients must be listed. Do not use extra words in the ingredient statement e.g. diced (as in diced peppers), whole (as in whole milk), fresh (as in fresh basil) All added colors result in an artificially colored food. No added color can be declared as “food” or “natural” color. Cheese cannot be called “natural” if it has annatto color. Food ingredients such as garlic, onion and celery cannot be included under the collective term “spice.” They must be listed individually. “Herb” and “herbs” can not be used as collective terms in an ingredient statement. Use the word “spice” or list all spices by name.

For more information about labeling cheese products, visit the Vermont Department of Agriculture. To learn more about having cheese label preprinted for wax and non wax coated products, contact ImageTek Labels.

* Article content was sourced by the T and Wisconsin Agricultural Department approved standards for cheese product labeling.

ImageTek Labels to Attend the NH Grocers Association Fall Conference & Exposition

Nh Grocers ImageTek Labels Join ImageTek Labels for the NH Grocers Association Fall Conference & Exposition on Wednesday, October 21st. This is by far the associations’ largest annual event, held at the Executive Courthouse Banquet Facility in Manchester, N.H. Suppliers from New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts participate to exhibit their products to an exclusive audience made up of the NHGA’s retail member business owners and decision makers, for independent and chain retail locations throughout New Hampshire.  The program also includes seminars and engaging speakers who will address topics that will help make running your business more productive and prosperous.

 

NH Grocers Exposition Event Registration

Event attendees must submit an entry form prior to the event. Registration is FREE for Retailers. Full Registration includes a continental breakfast, morning & afternoon sessions, luncheon and drawing entry. Follow the links below for event details.

Download Registration Form. 

Download Sponsorship & Advertising Form.

Download Exhibitor, Sponsor & Advertising Form.

Click Here for more information. Contact Us to request label samples for delivery at the event.

For more information about The NH Grocers Association Fall Conference & Exposition please visit the www.grocers.org website.

To contact ImageTek Labels prior to the event for label samples and/or press proofs, please email sales@imageteklabels.com or call (866) 403-5223.

 

ImageTek Labels to Attend the Made in New England “Try It & Buy It” Exposition.

ImageTek Attends Made in New England Expo

Mark your calendars! We’re headed to the Made in New England Expo in Sturbridge, Massachusetts on September 13 & 14th. The show offers New England quality product producers a place to showcase their products to wholesale buyers from all over the country, in search of new products. Located at the Sturbridge Host Hotel, this event is creates the perfect opportunity to to come and shop local products in time for the holiday’s. The Expo offers a unique and timely opportunity to shop products made right here in New England. The products are one of a kind!

Three Decades of New England’s Best Producers

For two decades, the show has continued to attract authentic New England Made food & beverage producers as well as artisans and is a true reflection of quality, locally made products that originate in the eastern states. The show offers a venue for buyers to not only source new product lines but to get to know the story behind these products. This event supports local business, encourages relationships between wholesale buyers and the business owners and inevitably puts the best products in front of consumers. This year, over 250 producers will exhibit their products at the Made in New England Show. Absolutely no importers are allowed to attend the event, making it easy for wholesalers to source local manufacturers of products like specialty foods, home furnishings, jewelry, apparel and art. This show presents the perfect opportunity for ImageTek Labels to connect with their current customers and show potential clients what sets the company apart from the completion.

For more information about The Made in New England Expo please visit the Made in New England website. To contact ImageTek Labels prior to the event for label samples and/or press proofs, please email sales@imageteklabels.com or call (866) 403-5223.

Wine and Glass Bottle Labels: Choosing a Suitable Media

 

Label Wine and Glass Bottles for Special Occasions  

Whether you’re a wine enthusiast looking to bottle your own blend or just wanting to create personalized glass bottle labels for a wedding or social event, you want to choose the right labelWine and glass bottle labels stock for a finished look that is just right. Though there are lots of different types of labels that might look the part, it’s important to use a label whose adhesive is meant for high surface energy products, like glass bottles.

Glass bottles are generally very smooth to the touch, which means the label adhesive has a lot of surface to cling to. Additionally, the labels often come in contact with the liquids inside the bottle, making adhesion pivotal to the labels success. Luckily, these types of challenges have bee met by producers past. Traditionally, waterproof labels are the perfect solution for labeling wine and beverage bottle and will leave you with a good looking label that will maintain their color and shape when exposed to moisture.

Waterproof Labels for Glass Bottle Labeling

Waterproof labels, also referred to as weatherproof labels, are common among wine and beverage producers. Generally, waterproof labels have a permanent adhesive which is why they can stake their resistant claim. Waterproof labels come in a variety of thicknesses and adhesive coatweights but the average bottler isn’t concerned with that. Most just want a smooth, glossy surface that will deliver bright vibrant colors once printed and won’t curl, fall off or smudge when they come in contact with moisture, ice or cold temperatures.

Now that we have narrowed down the type of label for the job let’s look at the most common finishes for glass bottles.

White Gloss BOPP Labels 

White gloss BOPP labels are perfect for printing crisp, clear graphics on wine or glass bottle labels. A go-to label media for printing custom labels that ‘POP’. The finished layer is coated to leave a shiny, smooth surface, adding a professional, finished look to the label. Perfect for intricate designs and small or individual portion bottling, gloss labels produce a superior finish.

Metallic Foil Labels

Think about the wine and specialty beverage labels you see on the grocery store shelves. The sparkly gold and silver foils that give the label a chic, sophisticated look. Foil labels are perfect for detail and add a sense of elegance. By creating artwork that has transparencies in the design, you can print directly onto the foil media with bold color and the areas that remain uncoated will showcase the unfinished foil. Metallic foil labels give an ultra-shiny, posh look to your label and are perfect to accentuate debossed or embossed label designs.

For more information about wine and beverage labeling, specialty media and more, contact ImageTek Labels at (802) 885-6208 or email our sales team.

Join Us at the Made in Vermont Marketplace Exposition

Showcasing the Best of Vermont with Locally Made Products

ImageTek Labels invites you to join us at the 2nd Annual Made in Vermont Marketplace Exhibition being held on April 11 & 12 at the Champlain Valley Exposition Center in Essex Made in Vermont Marketplace ExpositionJunction, VT. The Made in VT Exposition is designed to support local partnerships among VT business by providing a platform where companies can come together to share ideas and showcase their unique talents. Last year, more than 4,300 attendees and 200 exhibitors gathered to network, share ideas and support Vermont business.

This year you can expect to find specialty food purveyors, Vermont made wines, furniture, home décor, crafts and more! There is truly something for everyone and you will be amazed at what you can find in your own backyard.

View a List of Marketplace Exhibitor’s and Plan your Day!
Click Here for Exhibitors 

Find out more about sponsors, show hours and deadlines.
Attend the Expo!

Make sure to stop by the ImageTek Labels booth #224 and say hello! Doors open at 9:00am on Saturday. We look forward to seeing our friends and colleagues at the event. Custom samples are available and will be delivered in hand at the event for all requests place by April 1, 2015.

 

 

A New Label Look for a New Year

With a new year fast approaching it’s the perfect time to think about your custom label improvements for 2015. A lot of changes New Label Look happen over the course of a year. Your products need to evolve to remain at the forefront and stay competitive. New labels are the perfect way to rejuvenate your brand and the look of your product.

The New Year is a time for resolutions. Consumers are becoming more health conscience and searching for products that are environmentally friendly. Why not position your custom labels to meet the demands of your target audience and offer solutions that speak to their healthy lifestyle resolutions.

Three Ways to Update Your Labels for The New Year:

1.) Source Environmentally Friendly Labels and Brag About It.

More and more consumers are looking for ways to purchase the greenest products available. Whether chemical free products, or biodegradable packaging, using more earth friendly solutions will appeal to an entirely new audience and give your company something to talk about.  Business owners no longer have to trade quality or profits to find the right eco-friendly label solutions. Ask your label supplier to send you samples of their environmentally conscious materials and test them out. Chances are you may find an alternative that enhances your business model and brand identity.

2.) Play with Colors and Graphics to Make Your Labels ‘POP”

It takes longer to get a customers attention than it does to lose it. That’s right. You can actually train your customers not to see you! Using stale imagery, neutral color palettes and failing to adjust your design to the times can make that same fantastic product virtually invisible. Until recent digital print technologies, business owners would use the same design year after year because even the most minimal changes could be expensive and risky. Today, digital printing allows the same companies to try out a new look, variable designs and boast an array of crisp, vibrant color for no additional cost. These new print capabilities make it easy for companies to freshen up their age-old design, keeping their customers engaged and interested.

3.) Label Your Products with Descriptive Words That Align with Consumer Trends

The New Year is a time for change. This is the perfect opportunity to rethink your label design and speak directly to the solutions your customers seek.  Are your labels easy to read? Do they feature words like new or improved? Or, do they feature too much jargon that seems more like hype than it does describe the benefits of your product?  Revaluate the look of your labels, rally small focus groups for feedback and to test-run new ideas. Make sure your labels are speaking your consumer’s language. By evaluating your label design you will stay in-line with consumer trends and influence your customers buying decisions,

For more information or to receive materials for testing please contact sales@imageteklabels.com

 

 

 

 

Health Food Labels Help Consumers Make Better Buying Decisions

Health Food Labeling is All the Buzz

 

As Non-GMO labeling debates line the airwaves,  cultural norms take a massive shift towards more natural food alternatives.  Consumers are reading health food labels now, more than ever before and food producers find themselves having to redesign their labels and packaging in an effort to keep their products relevant and stand out on grocery store shelves.health food labels and fda nutrition content

Recent studies show an shift in consumers purchasing trends, with more and more people making buying decisions based on the ‘healthfulness’ of a product rather than price and taste alone. In addition to these buying trends, many consumers find themselves shopping at specialty health food stores in an attempt to introduce themselves to more mindful products and a wider variety of health food options. So what does that mean for the food producers?

That is a question that has raised a lot of attention from not only food producers, but also health food retail buyers and the Food & Drug Administration labeling guidelines department. With more products making nutritional value claims, using labeling terms like Fat-Free, Light and All Natural, the label guru’s at the FDA realize that not all these claims do in-fact mean healthier food alternatives.

 

Health Food Label Guidelines and The FDA

 

In short, the Food & Drug Administration is looking for ways to tighten the health food compliance guidelines and differentiate health options from those masking themselves as mindful choices when they are in fact loaded with sugar and byproducts.

While it is important for producers to understand what types of health food factors influence buying decisions, it is imperative that they also understand what constitutes a valid health food claim and how to properly label their products. By doing so, not only are health food producers better able to design labels that help them sell their products but they are able to identify fraudulent products that might be intruding on their market share. In the long run, the more producers know and understand health food labeling guidelines, the easier it will be to communicate superior products to a health conscience audience.

 

Health Food Content Label Claims

 

Health food content label claims are made all the time. By simply opening your fridge, you are likely to find items claiming to be fat-free,fat free label claims low in sodium, or light. Unfortunately, consumers are learning that those claims don’t always mean a more healthy food product. Any item that is made by process, i.e.; engineered to alter the core ingredients of a whole food can only claim their products are ‘free’, ‘low’ or ‘without benefit of special processing, alteration, formulation or reformulation’; e.g., “broccoli, a fat-free food” or “celery, a low calorie food”. If the core whole food ingredient is not considered ‘fat-free’, or ‘low in sodium’, than the engineered byproduct through manufacture is not authorized to make the claim.

 

Health Food Nutrient Label Claims

 

Never mind content claims, what about nutritional value claims? How many times have you seen health food products that claim to cure you from certain ailments or prevent you from getting certain diseases by simple consumption of the product? The FDA has cracked down on these nutritional labels claims, mandating that health food labels use words like “may, could or might” on their labels to avoid giving the impression that their products alone are capable of overall better health or disease prevention.

An example of this would be a carton of milk. Not long ago consumers would see labels that claimed milk would “prevent osteoporosis” and “ensure strong bones”. Today, the same milk producers have traded in these broad label claims for more model statements like “adequate calcium throughout life, as part of a well-balanced diet” and “may reduce the risk of osteoporosis”.

 

For other examples or to learn more about health food labeling and FDA guidelines visit www.fda.gov. For questions related to health food labeling contact ImageTek Labels at sales@imageteklabels.com or by call (866) 403-5223.  You may request a white page on FDA labeling guidelines by clicking here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NHGA Fall Conference

The NHGA Fall Conference & Exhibition 

The New Hampshire Grocers Association (NHGA) Fall Conference is the organizations biggest event of the year and only a few short weeks away.  Held at The Executive Courthouse Facility in Manchester, N.H., the expo brings together suppliers from all over New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts. The exposition allows NHGA members to get their products in front of an exclusive audience of retail buyers and business owners who are looking for new products to add to their line of inventory in locations throughout New Hampshire. NHGA Fall Conference & Expo

The NHGA Expo includes a variety of related seminars, with speakers who represent the best-of-the best in New Hampshire’s retail food industry. These seminars will address topics related to productivity, business planning, operations and best-practice with the goal of helping food producers increase revenues and further advance their business.

Event exhibition is exclusive to NHGA member-suppliers. Retail & distributor affiliates are welcome to attend and will receive free admission with pre-registration. For those wishing to attend, sponsor or advertise at the upcoming expo, here’s a few helpful links.

Download Registration Form

Download Exhibitor, Sponsor & Advertising Form

The NHGA Exposition Connects Food Producers and Retail Buyers

ImageTek Labels is especially excited for the fall exposition. The Annual NHGA Fall Exposition allows us the opportunity to connect with many of our customers and friends, attend relevant seminars and network with food retail experts who play an important role in consumer trends and distribution.

For those attending the expo, ImageTek Labels would be happy to bring you material and printed label samples. Please contact our customer representatives to discuss your labeling needs or submit your artwork to us for production by Friday, October 17th and we will print your samples and deliver them to you at the event.

 

Labeling Seasonal Beer and Malt Beverages

Seasonal Beer and Malt Beverage Labels have Specific Requirements.

Beer and malt beverage labels are a fundamental element in packaging your product for consumers. A malt beverage, as defined by Federal alcohol labeling requirements, is any product made at a brewery with malted barley and hops. Beer is the primary malt beverage. However, malt beverages do include both alcoholic as well as non-alcoholic products.  In order for consumers to understand the ingredients and nutritional values of these beverages, beer and malt beverage labels are required on all consumer products.

ImageTek Labels has designed the guide below, to help you understand what information must be present on your beer & malt beverage label. The guidelines dictating what information must be displayed on malt beverage labels have been established by  The U.S. Department of Alcohol and Tobacco, Tax and Trade Bureau, also known as the TTB.  The regulations set forth by the TTB, were designed to help consumers make more informed choices when buying beer and malt beverages. ImageTek cannot suggest label-printing alternatives, we are simply here to help you meet TTB labeling requirements and assist you with design and/or label printing. For more information about beer and malt beverage labeling please contact your state alcohol beverage authority.

Beer and Malt Beverage Labels Must Meet the Following Criteria:

A.) DRAFT/DRAUGHT

The presence of “DRAFT/DRAUGHT” on a label generally means that the product has not been pasteurized and some other method of removing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria has been utilized. However, pasteurized beer may be described as “Draft Brewed” or “Draft Beer Flavor” as long as the beer or malt beverage label discloses that the beer is pasteurized. The term may also be used if the beer is packaged in containers of one gallon or larger and the contents are to be drawn off through a tap, spigot, faucet, or similar device.

B.) BRAND NAME

The brand name is used to identify and market a beer or malt beverage. A brand name may not mislead the consumer about the age, identity, origin, or other characteristics of the malt beverage.

C.) NAME AND ADDRESS

The name and address of the bottler or importer must appear on the brand label. However, the address of the bottler’s principal place of business may be used instead of the actual location where the bottling took place. It is also permissible for a bottler/importer to use a duly authorized trade name in place of its usual operating name.

D.) CLASS DESIGNATION

The brand label of a beer or malt beverage must contain the class designation of the product. Examples of class designations are beer, ale and lager. Ale, stout, and porter are classes that must be fermented at a comparatively high temperature. Products labeled “Wheat Beer” must be made from a fermentable base that consists of at least 25% by weight malted wheat.

When a beer or malt beverage is made with the addition of spices, fruit, honey, or natural flavors, it requires specific labeling to indicate the class of designation. These malt beverages must be labeled with a statement of composition that reflects the base malt product and the added ingredients, unless otherwise known to the trade under a particular designation. Examples of statements of composition that you might see on malt beverage labels include “Premium malt beverage with natural flavors,” “Ale fermented with spices,” or “Belgian-style Wheat Ale brewed with natural flavors.” These products must also bear a distinctive or fanciful name (such as Tammy’s Treat”). A malt beverage must derive at least 51% of its alcohol content from the fermentation of brewing ingredients, with stricter limits for products with an alcohol content of more than 6 percent alcohol by volume.

E.) ALCOHOL CONTENT

An optional statement of alcohol content expressed in percent by volume may appear on the label. Federal regulations require the alcohol content to appear on the labels of flavored malt beverages that derive alcohol from added flavors. However, some State laws have their own requirements with regard to alcohol content statements.

LITE/LIGHT/LOW-CARB

A malt beverage may be labeled with a caloric representation (such as “Light” or “Lite”) as long as a statement of average analysis appears on the label. This statement must include the amount per serving of calories, carbohydrates, protein, and fat. In addition, a malt beverage may be labeled as “Low-Carbohydrate” if the label includes a statement of average analysis and the product contains no more than 7 grams of carbohydrates per 12-ounce serving.

F.) NET CONTENTS

The net content of a malt beverage container must be stated in English units of measure (e.g., pints, fluid ounces).

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

Pursuant to regulations issued by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a Country of Origin statement is required on containers of imported malt beverages. Acceptable statements include “Product of (insert name of country)” or “Produced/Brewed in (insert name of country).”

G.) HEALTH AND WARNING STATEMENT

By law, this statement is required on all alcoholic beverages containing 0.5% or more alcohol by volume.